Book Review: The Slow Burn Fitness Revolution

December 2, 2008

I read. A lot. It’s a great way to slow down, get centered, and keep up on what’s hot, and what’s not.

slow-burnFredrick Hahn, Michael R. Eades, and Mary Dan Eades came out with The Slow Burn Fitness Revolution: The Slow-Motion Exercise that Will Change Your Body in 30 Minutes a Week in 2003. I’ve known for a long time that slower movements have more impact than faster ones. Whether it is lifting weights or doing yoga, jerking motions only serve to strain ligaments and joints. I like the format of the book. It busts myths such as being fit means you are healthier, all exercise is good for you, and any physical activity is exercise. They define exercise to mean strength training. The stronger you are, the healthier you are. The pictures that accompany the exercise explanations are also easy to follow. I find reading about exercise as about as exciting as listening to grass grow, but the authors’ enthusiasm is rather infectious. It made for an easier read than I thought.

slow-burn-kidsRecently, Frederick Hahn came out with a children’s fitness book, Strong Kids Healthy Kids: The Revolutionary Program for Increasing Your Child’s Fitness in 30 Minutes a Week , which I found a bit harder to digest. I suppose the myths of weight training being bad for growing bodies remains strong in my mind. Weight training for eight-year-olds? I’d rather see my daughter lift the saddle onto the horse herself. Practical exercise, meaning integrated movement, seems less daunting than having your kids wield heavy weights. I will say the case studies the authors mention in the book were inspirational. In fact, when my seven-year-old son cried that he’s not as muscular as his eight-year-old friend, I pulled out the book to show him what’s possible. I doubt he has the focus for weight training just yet, but it’s good to know I have a resource when his interest grows as he does!

One Response to “Book Review: The Slow Burn Fitness Revolution”


  1. I enjoyed the first book, but I am more inclined to have my child just play ratherthan exercise


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