The other day I had a conversation about nutrition with a henchman. No, I wasn’t at the gallows. I was on a film set for a period film about an 18th century swindler. But that’s neither here nor there. What was interesting was this burly guy, with black makeup around his eyes (think: Johnny Depp as Captain Jack Sparrow) was telling me he doesn’t eat any carbs. At all.

Now I have had my own run-in with the carbs-no carbs conversation and have come to the conclusion that a touch of carbs, like a touch of red wine, is a good thing. It’s all about variety and filling your plate with things from outside in their most original form possible.

Processed foods can kill you. The Emmy Award-winning show The Doctors recently aired an episode with Dr. Jim Sears who showed a twelve-year-old hamburger in his nutrition classes. It has no mold on it whatsoever. Why? Because of all the chemicals that it was originally sprayed with ~not for the purpose of his classes, but for the purpose of consumption!

Here’s the visual.

The thing is as old as my kid. Ewwwww!

Would you eat a burger made out of “pink slime”—the name given to the mechanically separated meat that’s treated with ammonia hydroxide to kill bacteria like E-coli?  McDonald’s, Taco Bell and Burger King, once purveyors of pink slime, say they have discontinued their use of this meat, made from discarded beef (i.e. everything else from the cow that had been deemed inedible), but who still does? Schools serve it up daily in kids’ lunches.

If mold won’t eat it, why would you? See for yourself on this segment of The Doctors.

So now that I’ve thoroughly grossed you out, let’s talk about how to be proactive.

Education yourself. Read the labels. Teach your kids to do the same.

Buy organic where you can. That might mean eating less meat due to cost, but as I like to say, less is often more.

The average American eats 80+ pounds of chicken annually.

Tips to Buying Natural and Organic Poultry
• To save money, purchase the whole chicken. Boneless, skinless chicken breasts are the most expensive by the pound.
• Check the “sell by” dates, and plan to shop the day before, when your butcher marks down the poultry and meat.
• Consider buying direct from a farmer’s market.
• Check the sodium levels on fresh and frozen chicken packaging.
• A truly natural chicken breast has 50 to 75 mg of sodium. If there’s more than that, the bird has been “plumped”.

Fill at least half your plate with vegetables. That includes salad. Make your meat be the garnish, not the centerpiece.

How else can you get your plate in shape? Please share your ideas!

Advertisements

Flu season is upon us. As my eyes swell shut and my throat feels like daggers, I am reminded that prevention is the best medicine (along with laughter, but that’s another story). If you want to avoid the flu this season, check out what WomansDay has to say in their October issue. They offer up really practical advice about how to avoid germs in public places, including bathroom stalls (always opt for the stalls on either end of the row. They are used less – statistically speaking). Remember to wipe down those frequently used items like your phone and your remote control. Believe it or not, they house bacteria, just like your kitchen sponge. Believe me. Once you read the article on how to avoid germs, you will never use the same sponge for wiping counters as for cleaning dishes!